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Iran, Iraq, and the Greater Middle East   In the Hot Seat and Video Conference
In the Hot Seat and Video Conference
Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews: Iran, Iraq, and the Greater Middle East

September 9, 2014

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Nearly four decades after the hostage crisis, the U.S. and Iran have entered a new era where negotiations regarding Iran’s nuclear program are possible. In contrast, three and a half years after the U.S. troop withdrawal, Iraq is embroiled in political and humanitarian crises. Extremist Sunni militant groups, including the ISIS, have taken over swaths of northern and western Iraq, leading an estimated 1.2 million people to flee from potential violence. Some have fled to Syria, where civil war continues, and a lack of governance provides a staging ground for violent militant groups. In early August, the U.S. began using airstrikes to contain militants in Iraq, but has yet to commit to addressing the violence in Syria. What is the U.S. strategy in the Greater Middle East? What will the future hold for the relationship between the U.S. and Iran? How are U.S. airstrikes affecting the situation on the ground in Iraq? How are regional actors affecting internal politics?

For this event, students at Cornell High School will unpack the current situation in the region by hosting a talk-show style discussion with Dr. Mathews. Dr. Steven E. Sokol, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, will facilitate the session. Up to five interactive video conference sites can participate and submit questions prior to the program.

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a global think tank with offices in Washington, D.C., Moscow, Beijing, Brussels, and Beirut. Her distinguished career has included posts in the federal government, nonprofits, and policy organizations. She was formerly director of the Council on Foreign Relations’ Washington program and a senior fellow, and was founding vice president and director of research of the World Resources Institute. Dr. Mathews sits on multiple boards and publishes widely in newspapers and in scientific and foreign policy journals.

Video Conference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7973.

Register Now!

School Outreach

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews
President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Engaging Iran: A New Way Forward?
Engaging Iran: A New Way Forward?

September 9, 2014

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

It has been months since U.S. President Barack Obama announced that an interim deal had been struck between the group known as  the P5+1 and Iranian leadership over Iran’s nuclear program. The P5+1 includes Germany and the permanent members of the U.N. Security Council (China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States). In the meantime, a series of meetings have left analysts and observers speculating over the state of affairs. In late July, negotiators agreed to a four-month extension of talks to craft a final comprehensive deal. Many open questions remain as the deliberations move forward and the details of the agreement emerge.

What are the next steps in negotiating an agreement with Iran? Join two of the country’s preeminent foreign policy experts — who both serve as advisory members of  The Iran Project — for an analysis of one of the most significant geopolitical challenges of the 21st century.

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a global think tank with offices in Washington, D.C., Moscow, Beijing, Brussels, and Beirut. Her distinguished career has included posts in the federal government, nonprofits, and policy organizations. She was formerly director of the Council on Foreign Relations’ Washington program and a senior fellow, and was founding vice president and director of research of the World Resources Institute. Dr. Mathews sits on multiple boards and publishes widely in newspapers and in scientific and foreign policy journals.

Amb. Thomas R. Pickering is the former U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs and has served as U.S. Ambassador to Russia, India, the United Nations, Israel, and in numerous other posts. Widely regarded as one of the most exceptional diplomats in the history of the U.S. State Department, Amb. Pickering is the namesake of the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program. Following his retirement, he served as an executive as Boeing and currently is the chairman at the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress as well as the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy.

Registration
Students (with valid ID): Free | General: $15 | VIP: $50

(VIPs receive special seating and a private reception with the speakers beginning at 4:30 p.m.)

Registration is required. No-shows and cancellations after September 3, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

 

With special thanks to:

 

Media Sponsor:

Community Series

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews
President
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Amb. Thomas R. Pickering
Former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs
Former U.S. Ambassador to Russia        

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Breakfast Briefing
The U.S. Pivot to Asia: Why ASEAN Matters

July 24, 2014

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

The Obama Administration’s strategic recalibration toward Asia — commonly known as the “Asia pivot” —  is well-documented and has been addressed by political leaders, analysts, and pundits, but the stakes have never been higher. With a combined population of some four billion people, the region is as much a trendsetter and economic powerhouse as it is a flashpoint in geopolitics. From the on-going tension between China and its neighbors, to natural disasters such as Typhoon Haiyan, to emerging economies and their resource needs, to the growing economic opportunities, to the ambitious negotiations for a 21st century trade agreement under the auspices of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Asia-Pacific presents complex challenges as well as significant opportunities.

Join the World Affairs Council to learn from a former senior diplomat to the region and business practitioner about America’s evolving relationship with the Asia-Pacific region in the 21st century.

Ambassador (Ret.) David Carden returned to Jones Day in early 2014 after serving as the first resident U.S. Ambassador to the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) from March 2011 through 2013. He is currently based in Singapore and serves as Jones Days’ Partner-in-Charge of Asia.

As U.S. Ambassador, David Carden oversaw the broadening engagement of the United States in Southeast Asia, which included the Obama Administration’s 2011 “pivot” to Asia. Based in the U.S. Mission to ASEAN in Jakarta, he traveled extensively throughout the ASEAN’s ten member states and Asia. His responsibilities included supporting ASEAN as it moves toward economic integration in 2015 and advocating for the systemic changes necessary to promote peaceful and prosperous growth in the region. Under his leadership, the U.S. Mission focused on a host of issues including economic development, trade liberalization, intellectual property protection, developing effective governance, pandemic preparedness and prevention, effective responses to natural disasters,  the advancement of health care and educational opportunities, trafficking, food and water security, and sustainable cities. He worked to build alliances in the region — including facilitating efforts by the embassies of countries in the European Union and Latin America in their engagement with ASEAN.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $25 | Non-Members: $50

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.  No-shows and cancellations after July 21, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With thanks to Jones Day for supporting this event.

 

Community Series

Amb. David Carden
Partner-in-Charge of Asia, Jones Day
Former U.S. Ambassador to the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN)

Kavitha Rajagopalan Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Emergent Cities Project at the World Policy Institute Author of Muslims of Metropolis: The Stories of their Immigrant Families in the West
Political Salon
The Emergent City: Capitalizing on Migration and the Informal Economy

July 16, 2014

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

What will the city of tomorrow look like? For the first time in history, more people live in cities than in rural areas — and by mid-century, urban populations are projected to double to seven billion. As cities are growing in population, they are increasing their geographic footprint at an accelerating pace. Most of this growth is taking place in the developing world where cities are receiving millions of rural migrants annually. Few cities are able to absorb these new urban dwellers into the formal economy and cannot provide adequate housing, transportation, health care, and other public services. Meanwhile, in the developed world, urban migrants — particularly the undocumented — are regularly denied access to formal employment and public services, forcing them to fall back on informal networks. In short: the movement of people to urban areas brings a myriad of challenges — but also opportunities.

Join Vibrant Pittsburgh and the World Affairs Council to learn more about the “emergent city” and lessons that Pittsburgh can learn from cities undergoing structural change. This event comes on the heels of an announcement at the 2014 Clinton Global Initiative America by the World Policy Institute regarding the launch of a two-year pilot project to repopulate and revitalize Detroit using lessons learned from thriving communities in developing world megacities.

Kavitha Rajagopalan is the Co-Director of the Emergent City Project at the World Policy Institute. She is the author of Muslims of Metropolis: The Stories of Three Immigrant Families in the West, a narrative nonfiction exploration of integration and identity formation in the urban Muslim diaspora. Her projects include research and advocacy on the causes and consequences of undocumented migration, urban informality, and minority access to mainstream financial systems. She writes widely on global migration and diversity and has taught related courses at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs.

Registration
There is a $20 charge for this event - including one drink ticket and appetizers provided by Bar Marco. No-shows and cancellations after July 11, 2014 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

With thanks to the Heinrich Böll Foundation for supporting this event.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Community Series

Kavitha Rajagopalan
Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Emergent Cities Project at the World Policy Institute
Author of Muslims of Metropolis: The Stories of their Immigrant Families in the West

U.S.-Vietnam Relations and the Rebalance to Asia
Breakfast Briefing
U.S.-Vietnam Relations and the Rebalance to Asia

July 8, 2014

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

It has been over 50 years since the U.S. sent combat advisors to Vietnam, a first step in a massive escalation that included the deployment of over half a million U.S. military personnel at the peak of American involvement in the Vietnam War. Relations chilled after the conflict, but 1995 marked the formal normalization of trade relations with Vietnam. For the last two decades, the international community has witnessed the country of some 89 million people ascend as an important power in the Asia-Pacific.

Still a one-party Communist state forged from decades of conflict, Vietnam has one of the fastest-growing economies and aspires to be a developed nation within the next decade. Just seven years ago, Vietnam joined the World Trade Organization as its 150th member.

In the midst of these developments, what’s next for Vietnam? As the Asia-Pacific becomes increasingly more important to American foreign policy, join the World Affairs Council and a senior U.S. State Department diplomat for an examination of the U.S.-Vietnam relationship in the 21st century.

Dr. Scott Kofmehl joined the Foreign Service in 2006. He is currently based in Washington, D.C. where he serves as the Senior Vietnam Desk Officer at the U.S. Department of State. Dr. Kofmehl has served in various diplomatic posts overseas, including Chief of Staff at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad Pakistan, Economic Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, and Vice Consul at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, Mexico. He graduated from North Allegheny High School and earned his Bachelor of Arts in International Political Economy from Juniata College, Master’s from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and Ph.D. in international relations from the London School of Economics. Dr. Kofmehl's spouse, Aryani Manring, is also a Foreign Service Officer, currently serving as the Mongolia Desk Officer. They live in Washington, D.C. with their daughter.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $25 | Non-Members: $50
Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.  No-shows and cancellations after July 3, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Community Series

Dr. Scott Kofmehl
Senior Vietnam Desk Officer
U.S. Department of State

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